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tour Vancouver to Banff, Where to stay in Banff in Spring

  1. By kevin
  2. On Apr 19, 2018
  3. North America
  4. Travel Tips

We talk about the information about where to stay in Banff in Spring, and you can book the tour Vancouver to Banff on the Globerouter.com website with deals now. It's the best time to visit Banff, and On your day off, leave your posh resort to explore the stores and restaurants in downtown Banff, which encompasses just 1 ? square miles and sits at an elevation of 4,537 feet, making it the highest town in Canada.

Where to stay in Banff in Spring?

Banff Upper Hot Springs

These springs, which were first discovered by Canada's First Nations people prior to the 1880s, were regarded as sacred waters that could cure illness and maintain health. Now, the springs are a popular tourist attraction thanks to their serene atmosphere and stunning alpine views. The facility, which is akin to Budapest's thermal baths, features all of the modern amenities you would expect from a public swimming pool (such as railings, ladders, lockers, changing areas, a cafe and a gift shop), but the water is kept at 98 to 104 degrees Fahrenheit and is infused with minerals like sulfate, calcium, bicarbonate, magnesium and sodium.

Recent visitors described the springs as "relaxing" and a great thing to do at the end of the day. Along with the mountain vistas, travelers also appreciated how clean the facility is kept, though, they do warn that it can get crowded, especially during ski season. Another gripe with reviewers: at times, the natural flow from the springs is insufficient, so the pool is supplemented with municipal water. That means if you came to take advantage of the springs' "sacred" properties, you may be out of luck.

Accessible via Roam bus, the Banff Upper Hot Springs sit at the top of Mountain Avenue, about 2 ? miles south of Banff Town. You'll find a parking lot, a gift shop, an ATM, picnic spots and walking trails on-site. Admission costs CA$8.30 (about $6.60) for adults ages 18 to 64, CA$6.30 (around $5) for youths between 3 and 17; children younger than 3 enter for free. A family rate of CA$24.50 (approximately $19) for two adults and two children is also available. Swimsuits and towels are available to rent. Use of a locker is included for adults and families.

Cave and Basin National Historic Site

This is a popular attraction among nature lovers and history buffs alike. Experts refer to this site as the birthplace of Banff National Park and the natural hot springs have lured travelers in search of solace for years. Although the original springs are no longer open to the public (the Banff Upper Hot Springs are the new hot spot for comfort-seekers), the Cave and Basin National Historic Site does feature interactive displays educating visitors on local wildlife and the history behind the park's establishment.

Travelers who stopped here while in Banff said this a must-visit, not only for its historical significance but also for the stunning views. Others commend the informative displays and friendly staff. If you have time, you should plan to tag along on the hour-long, guided Discovery Tour, which is included in the cost of admission. The tour explains how railway workers first discovered the thermal pools and their uses and allows participants to dip their hands in the steamy thermal waters.

Sitting a mile west of Banff Town, the Cave and Basin National Historic Site operates different hours depending on the season (a detailed schedule is available on the Parks Canada website). Generally, it welcomes visitors from 9 or 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Admission costs CA$3.90 per adult (about $3) and free for youths 17 and younger. Along with the site's interactive exhibits, you'll also find a gift shop, a cafe, parking, restrooms, picnic tables and more than 4 miles of walking trails.