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Places to visit around Toronto, 3 Best Things To Do in Toronto

  1. By Kevin
  2. On May 2, 2017
  3. North America
  4. Travel Tips

What about the places to visit around Toronto, what about the best things to do in Toronto? Let's get to know this US city and make your travel plan now.

Harbourfront Centre

Situated along the banks of Lake Ontario, this 10-acre attraction has transformed from a derelict shipping terminal to an upscale neighborhood bustling with hundreds to things to do. Abandoned warehouses have been transformed into theaters and an art gallery, giving it an atmosphere comparable to Pier 39 in San Francisco and Baltimore's Inner Harbor. There's also multiple eateries around as well as several small parks, including the Toronto Music Garden, designed in part by cellist Yo Ma. And if you're around during the summer, you can kick back on Sugar Beach, a former parking lot transformed into an urban beach. The Harbourfront Centre also hosts upward of 4,000 events throughout the year to service the 12 million people that pass through the area every year. You definitely won't be bored in Toronto.

Visitors and locals alike both agree that Harbourfront Centre makes for a pleasant visit, not to mention the perfect place for a peaceful stroll. Travelers loved the city and lake vistas, but some warned visitors to pack an extra layer to brave the lake winds, no matter what time of year you visit. If you happen to be around in the winter, locals strongly encourage an ice skating excursion here, simply for the views. You can find Harbourfront Centre in downtown Toronto, about half a mile from the CN Tower.

Kensington Market

If you don't mind a bit of chaos, the Kensington Market in a Toronto must-see. Previously a Jewish neighborhood, the market came to life around the 1920s when families would set up stands in front of their houses to sell one another goods. Today, this marketplace has grown in both size and diversity. Streets are lined with shops and restaurants selling a variety of goods from Europe to Asia and beyond. Note: Kensington Market is the name of the neighborhood in which these shops and restaurants reside, not an actual outdoor market. The last Sunday of every month, however, is the closest you'll come to having that traditional market experience. The area goes completely car-free and fills up with shoppers, along with some lively street performers.

Recent visitors lauded Kensington Market for its variety, with many saying the neighborhood truly has it all. Fashionistas will appreciate the plethora of vintage stores while foodies will salivate at all the delectable (but oftentimes pricey) options available. Even if you aren't much of a shopper, many say a casual stroll through the quirky, art-clad neighborhood is more than enough to satiate travelers. Kensington Market is located near downtown Toronto, less than a mile west of the St. Patrick subway station.

Hockey Hall of Fame and Museum

Recent visitors enjoyed their time at the Hockey Hall of Fame. Many travelers, both Canadian and foreign, were impressed with the extent of information and artifacts on display. However, this may not be the best place for someone who isn't into hockey, or even sports in general. The majority of travelers who took to this attraction expressed a slight to serious interest in the sport, while those who didn't admitted to boredom after some time. The Hockey Hall of Fame and Museum is open every day; hours depend on both the day and the season. General admission is CA$ 18 for adults (about $13.40) and CA$ 12 for children (about $8.90).

No trip to Toronto (or Canada in general, really) is complete without a dose of hockey in one form or another. Although hockey isn't the official sport of Canada, it is the unofficial religion; thousands of Torontonians flock to the Air Canada Centre to support the Toronto Maple Leafs. Even if you're visiting in summer, you can still get your fix at the Hockey Hall of Fame and Museum, just a block or so east of Union Station. Covering a whopping 65,000 square feet of space, this site is a goldmine of paraphernalia, with exhibits including such artifacts as the original Stanley Cup, Max Bentley's stick and Terry Sawchuk's goalie gear. While you're here, check out the reproduction of the Montreal Canadians' locker room and the Puck Wall, which displays more than 1,000 pucks that were each collected from different tournaments around the world.